cleaning up so well (jones_casey) wrote,
cleaning up so well
jones_casey

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how does it feel?

friday lxxxv

go state.

the cliff-dwellers, driven by dreaded enemies to this last stand, had cunningly cut the rock until it balanced perfectly, ready to be dislodged by strong hands. just below it leaned a tottering crag that would have toppled, starting an avalanche on an acclivity where no sliding mass could stop. crags and pinnacles, splintered cliffs, and leaning shafts and monuments, would have thundered down to block forever the outlet to deception pass.

"you are a strange man. i suppose i must believe what you say--unless you and that fat mate of yours are a couple of escaped lunatics that got hold of a brig by some means."

on all sides the "apprentice," said to be young and handsome, had awakened public sympathy, and revived the hatred felt against cornelius; so that there was not a young man in the town, nor a young woman with a fresh face and pretty feet to exhibit, who was not determined to see the victim.

note broadly in the outset, shakespeare has no heroes;--he has only heroines. there is not one entirely heroic figure in all his plays, except the slight sketch of henry the fifth.

then the mother regarded the girl as a dissembler.

long he wandered, and carefully he sought; but could not find the earth spirits' home. and when at length he reached the pleasant garden where he and lily-bell first parted, he said within himself,--

"here i will stay awhile, and try to win by kindly deeds the flowers' forgiveness for the pain and sorrow i brought them long ago; and they may learn to love and trust me.
the first of benham`s early essays was written in an almost boyish hand, it was youthfully amateurish in its nervous disposition to definitions and distinctions, and in the elaborate linking of part to part. it was called true democracy. manifestly it was written before the incident of the trinity hall plates, and most of it had been done after prothero`s visit to chexington. white could feel that now inaudible interlocutor. and there were even traces of sir godfrey marayne`s assertion that democracy was contrary to biology. from the outset it was clear that whatever else it meant, true democracy, following the analogy of true politeness, true courage, true honesty and true marriage, did not mean democracy at all. benham was, in fact, taking prothero`s word, and trying to impose upon it his own solidifying and crystallizing opinion of life.

they were not as yet very large or well-formed crystals. the proposition he struggled to develop was this, that true democracy did not mean an equal share in the government, it meant an equal opportunity to share in the government. men were by nature and in the most various ways unequal. true democracy aimed only at the removal of artificial inequalities. . . .

it was on the truth of this statement, that men were by nature unequal, that the debate had turned. prothero was passionately against the idea at that time. it was, he felt, separating himself from benham more and more. he spoke with a personal bitterness. and he found his chief ally in a rigorous and voluble frenchman named carnac, an aggressive roman catholic, who opened his speech by saying that the first aristocrat was the devil, and shocked prothero by claiming him as probably the only other sound christian in the room. several biologists were present, and one tall, fair youth with a wearisome forefinger tried to pin carnac with questions.
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